Vic Williams


Published on Oct 10, 2013
A veteran makes a personal appeal to the British Prime Minister to stop the practice of discrimination against veterans.

Vic Williams

Vic Williams

Vic Williams is typical. He joined the Royal Navy and stayed with the aircraft carrier HMS Formidable as an able seaman throughout the war and until 1946. He saw action all over the world including in Sicily, Malta and the Pacific and has the medals to prove it.

After fighting for his country, Vic returned to the printing business where he met his wife. They were married in 1954 and had a daughter in 1955 after which the family chose to emigrate to Canada.

Vic worked hard all his life and bought a house in Mississauga, Ontario. Long retired and now widowed, Vic, 92, still lives in the same house.

Vic feels that the British Government have overlooked his commitment to his country by “freezing” his minimum pension just because he chose to retire in Canada and not America, France or Spain where pension payouts rise each year. 

“I am a veteran. I had the honour of fighting for my country in World War II. I saw action and lost friends. I fought for my country because I believed it was the right thing to do. After the war, I worked in Britain, and made my compulsory National Insurance contributions like everyone else. I emigrated to Canada, a Commonwealth country, because Canada shares a common heritage with Britain”.